Tag: ticks

Know the enemy—We’ve got intel on what makes fleas and ticks tick

They think of your dog as their summer home and they plan to take up residence for generations unless you evict them. And it’s not just that these parasites are pesky and nasty. There is also a risk of your pet contracting various diseases and developing certain health issues because of the... more
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Insect Repellents and Children

Choosing an Insect Repellent for Your Child Mosquitoes, biting flies, and tick bites can make children miserable. While most children have only mild reactions to insect bites, some children can become very sick. One way to protect your child from biting insects is to use insect... more
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Not all ticks are the same

There are hundreds of unique tick species in the world. As for those that like to feed on dogs, the most common species include deer ticks (also known as black-legged ticks), Lone Star ticks, American Dog ticks, Brown Dog tick, Rocky Mountain Wood ticks, etc. There are differences in both the... more
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Protection from Biting Insects

What is the best way to protect myself from biting insects while working outdoors this summer? Mosquitoes, ticks and other biting pests are more than just an itchy nuisance— they can even spread disease. So, protecting yourself from bug bites is an essential part of on-the-job safety.... more
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Ticks are a close cousin to spiders

A close cousin to spiders, the tick is considered to be an arachnid (thanks to their eight legs). Unfortunately, when one bites, you don’t get to be a superhero. Ticks are bigger than the flea, measuring in at ¼ to 1/8-inches long. While they are not blessed with the same super-jumping abilities... more
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Tuck in your shirt tail when adult ticks are active

Adult ticks typically latch on about knee level, while nymphs commonly latch on at shoe level. But ALL ticks tend to crawl upward; so while nymphs crawl upward under pant cuffs, adult ticks will crawl up the outside of pants, then readily continue to crawl upward under an untucked shirt. It... more
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Life-cycle of Ixodes scapularis (a.k.a. blacklegged or deer tick)

Life-cycle of Ixodes scapularis(a.k.a. blacklegged or deer tick) in the northeast/mid-Atlantic/upper mid-western United States. Larval deer ticks are active in August and September but these ticks are pathogen-free. Ticks become infected with pathogens when larvae (or nymphs) take a blood meal... more
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Happy Independence Day from A1

You're Not The Only One Celebrating! Mice and other pests don't take breaks on holiday's. If you need HELP with pest issues call any one of our many offices. Quick Tip: If you know where mice are breaking in, wad up some foil and firmly jam it in the hole. We don't know if mice don't like the... more
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Lyme disease begins in up to 60 to 80% of patients

Lyme disease begins in up to 60 to 80% of patients as a slowly expanding reddish rash known as “erythema migrans”, typically 3 to 32 days after the bite of an infectious tick. This rash, which may not be apparent on dark-skinned people, usually begins at the location where the tick attached... more
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Ticks cannot jump or fly

Ticks cannot jump or fly, but often climb grasses and shrubs in order to come in contact with people or animals walking by so they can attach themselves and feed on blood. Ticks have the potential to transmit diseases such as Lyme disease. Most tick-borne diseases require the tick to be attached... more
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