Tag: mice

Confirm that you have a mouse problem

Mice are like tiny, four-legged ninjas who make themselves scarce, but when you have a potential rodent problem, you might spot one scampering away out of the corner of your eye. Once you see one inside your house, you should immediately suspect you have a nest somewhere—in your walls, in the... more
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A Mouse Infestation in Your House: Health Risks and Solutions

Did you know that a house mouse is able to walk on a thin wire or squeeze itself through an opening or crack that is no wider than a ballpoint pen? It doesn’t take a very big opening before the mice find a way into our homes. These nimble rodents like to build small nests in cozy, dark spaces... more
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Mice in the House

Do not be fooled by their cute and fuzzy faces: Mice are not creatures you want in your house. It’s one thing to see a little field mouse scurry down a path in a park, and another thing entirely when they’re chewing your furniture, leaving droppings all over the kitchen or gnawing electrical... more
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Pest Prevention Tips

Remove sources of food, water and shelter. Store food in sealed plastic or glass containers. Garbage containing food scraps should be placed in tightly covered trashcans. Remove garbage regularly from your home. Fix leaky plumbing and don't let water accumulate anywhere in the home.... more
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Happy Independence Day from A1

You're Not The Only One Celebrating! Mice and other pests don't take breaks on holiday's. If you need HELP with pest issues call any one of our many offices. Quick Tip: If you know where mice are breaking in, wad up some foil and firmly jam it in the hole. We don't know if mice don't like the... more
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Confirm that you have a mouse problem

Mice are like tiny, four-legged ninjas who make themselves scarce, but when you have a potential rodent problem, you might spot one scampering away out of the corner of your eye. Once you see one inside your house, you should immediately suspect you have a nest somewhere—in your walls, in the... more
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What activities increase my risk of exposure to diseases carried by rodents?

Entering or cleaning buildings that have been closed for a long period of time, such as hunting shacks, garages, storage sheds, or anywhere with rodent droppings. You can also get sick by: Breathing dust that is contaminated with urine or droppings. Direct contact with an infected... more
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Rude winter rodent guest

Rodents don’t make good house guests whether they are inside or outside. They dig in flower beds; cause damage to buildings, electrical wiring, vehicles, boats, tools, tarps, linens, paper products, insulation and so much more; they poop everywhere; they spread diseases and they get into any... more
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It’s just a couple mice…

Some people might think that a couple of mice aren’t a big deal. But two mice in your home can do a lot of damage. In just six months, two mice can eat four pounds of food and leave 18,000 droppings. Plus, mice multiply fast. One female can have five to 10 litters of about five or six mice a... more
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Cold weather drives mice to warm homes

Cold weather drives most animals and insects to find warmth, which could lead them straight to your house. And if they find a food source, they’re moving in. What are the signs that you have mice? Mouse droppings. Little bits of chewed-up food packages. You might also be able to hear them... more
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