Category: Stink Bugs

Why Stink Bugs Come Indoors

Seasonal cues trigger stink bugs' search for winter quarters; the shortening days and falling temperatures sending them scuttling for cover. If they sheltered beneath tree bark or mulch, it would be one thing. But they prefer sharing your home over winter, piling into cracks and crevices by the... more
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Stink Bug Odor

Stink bugs get their name from the unpleasant odor they produce when they are threatened. It is thought that this odor helps protect the bugs against predators. The stink bugs produce the smelly chemical in a gland on their abdomen. Some species can actually spray the chemical several inches. The... more
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What are Stink Bugs

The brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) is considered an invasive species, or a pest of foreign origin, as it was introduced to the United States from Eastern Asia in the mid-1990s. It is also referred to as the yellow-brown or East Asian stink bug. The bug was first collected in the United States in... more
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Stink Bugs Hanging Around

Brown marmorated stink bugs will not cause structural damage or reproduce in homes. They do not bite people or pets. Although they are not known to transmit disease or cause physical harm, the insect produces a pungent, malodorous chemical and when handling the bug, the odor is transferred... more
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More Facts About Stink Bugs

The family Pentatomidae, to which these garden pests belong, contains some 900 genera and over 4700 species. More common types include brown, green, rice, Southern and dusky stink bugs. Other family types include shield bugs and chust bugs. Most are identified by their shield, the hardened part of... more
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Stink Bug Threats

Native to Asia, stink bugs were accidentally introduced into the United States sometime during the late 1990s. As an invasive species, they do not have any natural predators and can therefore rapidly spread. Stink bugs have become established in many areas of the country, posing a particular threat... more
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Stink Bug Prevention Tips

Seal and caulk cracks around windows, doors, siding, utility pipes, behind chimneys and underneath the wood fascia and other openings. Repair or replace damaged screens on windows or doors. Keep outdoor lighting to a minimum as stink bugs are attracted to lights. If stink bugs have... more
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Stink bugs expected to invade homes as cooler weather approaches

As the season begins to change and cooler weather approaches, stink bugs are starting to leave the garden and seek warmth and shelter indoors. The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) encourages homeowners to take proactive steps to prevent a stink bug infestation in and around the home this... more
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Stink Bug Life Cycle

Barrel-shaped eggs are laid on the underside of leaves in clusters with tight rows; in early spring, overwintered adult females seek out suitable hosts and typically deposit their eggs on wild host plants. Often these overwintering populations are found along field borders, particularly along... more
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Stink Bug Habits

In general, adult stink bugs feed on fruits and nymphs feed on leaves, stems and fruit. The life cycle of brown marmorated stink bugs generally involves mating, reproducing and feeding from spring to late fall. Upon the onset of cold weather, stink bugs seek shelter to spend... more
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