Bug Archives: News

Getting Rid Of Bugs, Try Eating Them??

Gross or great? Unexpected delicacies from around the world

Published July 23, 2012 / The Daily Meal

In the field of adventurous eating, those seeking flavor-packed thrills are often ready and willing to sample the world’s most exotic cultural delicacies and outrageous ingredients.
However, there are some foods out there that push those with even the most fearless palates to the outer limits of their culinary comfort zones. Considered delicacies in some parts of the world, these dishes prey on the phobias of the squeamish and even make some courageous eaters cringe.

Teriyaki Cockroaches
Hissing cockroaches are one of the the largest species of cockroach, and sometimes can grow as large as 7.5 centimeters. At the Gene Rurka Farm in New Jersey, these crawling critters are injected with honey and soy sauce, fried, and served as a crunchy treat.

Chapulines
Chapulines, or grasshoppers, elevate bug-eating to a gourmet delicacy. Eaten predominantly in the Oaxaca region of Mexico, chapulines are high in nutrients and provide a cheap source of protein. Classic chapuline recipes incorporate tortillas, chile, garlic, and lime juice.

Chapulines must be thoroughly cooked before consumption, as they sometimes carry nematodes that can infest the human body. Buy these crunchy critters at the Benito Juarez Market

Fried Tarantula
A delicacy of Cambodia, fried tarantulas are consumed primarily in towns such as Skuon, where they are sold in stalls at food markets. Crispy tarantulas with lime and kampot black pepper dip is served at Friends in Phnom Penh.

Locals began eating the eight-legged creatures in order to stave off famine during the reign of Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. These edible spiders are fried in oil and contain gooey insides with a crunchy exterior.

Squirrel Brains
Squirrel brains are a regional delicacy in Appalachian regions in Kentucky. Popular recipes include scrambling squirrel brains with eggs or including the meat in a stew known as burgoo.

In recent years, however, doctors have warned against squirrel consumption because of the possibility that squirrels carry a variant of fatal mad cow disease.

 http://www.foxnews.com/leisure/2012/07/23/gross-or-great-unexpected-delicacies-from-around-world/#ixzz22UTX8Cfe

We’re Hot, Sticky And Getting Bit More???

Record summer heat brings out the bugs

Published July 25, 2012 / LiveScience

If you’re feeling extra mosquito-bit this summer, you’re not alone. According to the National Pest Management Association (NPMA), record hot summer temperatures are bringing out the bugs.

Ants, fleas, ticks, earwigs and black widow are among the pests that are making a strong showing this year, according to the NPMA.

“Insects are cold-blooded, which means that their body temperatures are regulated by the temperature of their environment,” NPMA public affairs officer Missy Henriksen said in a statement. “In cold weather, insects’ internal temperatures drop, causing them to slow down. But in warm weather, they become more active. Larvae grow at a faster rate, reproduction cycles speed up, and they move faster.”

Hot has been the watchword this year, with the first half of 2012 measuring up as the warmest on record for the United States. June 2011 to June 2012 was also the warmest 12-month period since record-keeping began in 1895, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Drought across the country’s midsection can also exacerbate pest problems, Henriksen said. When insects and arachnids can’t find moisture outside, they often head indoors. Areas where rain is more frequent are likely to see increased mosquito breeding, she added.

About 64 percent of the continental United States was experiencing drought as of July 19. The unusually hot summer has also contributed to incidents of heat stroke, low water supply in some areas and blows to agriculture.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/07/25/record-summer-heat-brings-out-bugs/#ixzz21kGnmJGs

Termites Eat $43,000 in Safe

Termites cause damage to money in safe
The China Post/Asia News Network
Wednesday, Jun 27, 2012

TAIWAN – A woman has recently turned to the Investigation Bureau to help her exchange bundles of damaged bills originally worth a total of NT$1 million (S$42,750) for new ones after she found the files of cash she stored in her safe had been eaten by termites.

However, the forensic expert only managed to piece together NT$26,000 in notes from the piles of damaged bills, according to a local media report yesterday.

The woman, surnamed Chen, who graduated from a Taipei university last year, was originally going to spend the NT$1 million to study abroad, according to the Chinese-language Apple Daily report yesterday.

It took her eight years of hard work to come up with the money which she stored at a safe in her house. This April, Chen found that termites had eaten most of the piles of cash in the safe.

She later sought out the Investigation Bureau for help after a bank refused to honor the bills.

The bills were sent to the bureau’s forensic unit for further examination. They will be honored based on the number of bills the experts succeed in restoring.

After spending a week trying to re-piece the notes, forensic experts only managed to restore NT$26,000 from the piles of money, the report said.

 

Full Article Source: Asia One

Signs, Symptoms & Treatment For The EEEV Disease

Symptoms

The incubation period for Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) disease (the time from infected mosquito bite to onset of illness) ranges from 4 to 10 days. EEEV infection can result in one of two types of illness, systemic or encephalitic (involving swelling of the brain, referred to below as EEE). The type of illness will depend on the age of the person and other host factors. It is possible that some people who become infected with EEEV may be asymptomatic (will not develop any symptoms).

Systemic infection has an abrupt onset and is characterized by chills, fever, malaise, arthralgia, and myalgia. The illness lasts 1 to 2 weeks, and recovery is complete when there is no central nervous system involvement. In infants, the encephalitic form is characterized by abrupt onset; in older children and adults, encephalitis is manifested after a few days of systemic illness. Signs and symptoms in encephalitic patients are fever, headache, irritability, restlessness, drowsiness, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, cyanosis, convulsions, and coma.

Approximately a third of all people with EEE die from the disease. Death usually occurs 2 to 10 days after onset of symptoms but can occur much later. Of those who recover, many are left with disabling and progressive mental and physical sequelae, which include can range from minimal brain dysfunction to severe intellectual impairment, personality disorders, seizures, paralysis, and cranial nerve dysfunction. Many patients with severe sequelae die within a few years.

Treatment

No human vaccine against EEEV infection or specific antiviral treatment for clinical EEEV infections is available. Patients with suspected EEE should be evaluated by a healthcare provider, appropriate serologic and other diagnostic tests ordered, and supportive treatment provided.

Clinical Evaluation (for Health Care Providers)

Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings include neutrophil-predominant pleocytosis and elevated protein levels; glucose levels are normal. Brain lesions are typical of encephalomyelitis and include neuronal destruction and vasculitis, which is perivascular and parenchymous at the cortex, midbrain, and brain stem. There is minimal involvement of the spinal cord.

EEEV is difficult to isolate from clinical samples; almost all isolates (and positive PCR results) have come from brain tissue or CSF. Serologic testing remains the primary method for diagnosing EEEV infection. Combined with a consistent clinical presentation in an endemic area, a rapid and accurate diagnosis of acute neuroinvasive EEEV disease can be made by the detection of EEEV-specific IgM antibody in serum or CSF. EEEV IgM tests are available commercially, in some state health department laboratories, and at CDC. A positive EEEV IgM test result should be confirmed by neutralizing antibody testing of acute- and convalescent-phase serum specimens at a state public health laboratory or CDC. To submit specimens for testing at CDC, please contact your state health department.

All EEEV disease cases should be reported to local public health authorities. Reporting can assist local, state and national authorities to recognize outbreaks of this rare disease and to institute control measures to limit future infections.

I Have A Tick Bite, Does That Mean I Have Lyme Disease?

No!

The chances that you might get Lyme disease from a single tick bite depend on the type of tick, where you acquired it, and how long it was attached to you. Many types of ticks bite people in the U.S., but only blacklegged ticks transmit the bacteria that cause Lyme disease. Furthermore, only blacklegged ticks in the highly endemic areas of the northeastern and north central U.S. are commonly infected. Finally, blacklegged ticks need to be attached for at least 24 hours before they can transmit Lyme disease. This is why it’s so important to remove them promptly and to check your body daily for ticks if you live in an endemic area (and we do).

It’s important to know and watch for symptoms of Lyme disease because ticks are hard to find and it’s easy to overlook a tick bite — in fact, many people who get Lyme disease don’t remember being bitten. The good news is that most tick bites don’t result in Lyme disease.

The signs and symptoms of Lyme disease are variable, usually involving more than one system. The skin, joints and nervous system are affected most often. In general, Lyme disease can cause:

  • Rash. A few days to a month before you have other symptoms, a small, red bump may appear at the site of the tick bite. Over the next few days, the redness expands, forming a rash in a bull’s-eye pattern, with a red outer ring surrounding a clear area. The rash, called erythema migrans, is one of the hallmarks of Lyme disease. Some people develop several of these rashes, an indication of bacteria multiplying in the blood stream.
  • Flu-like symptoms. Fever, chills, fatigue, body aches and a headache may accompany the rash.
  • Migratory joint pain. If the infection is not treated, you may develop bouts of severe joint pain and swelling several weeks to months after you’re infected. Your knees are especially likely to be affected, but the pain can shift from one joint to another.
  • Neurological problems. In some cases, inflammation of the membranes surrounding your brain (meningitis), temporary paralysis of one side of your face (Bell’s palsy), numbness or weakness in your limbs, and impaired muscle movement may occur weeks, months or even years after an untreated infection.
  • Less common signs and symptoms. Some people may experience heart problems — such as an irregular heartbeat — several weeks after infection, but this rarely lasts more than a few days or weeks. Eye inflammation, hepatitis and severe fatigue are possible as well.

When to see a doctor
If you know you’ve been bitten and experience signs and symptoms of Lyme disease — particularly if you live in an area where Lyme disease is prevalent — contact your doctor immediately. Treatment for Lyme disease is most effective if begun early. Only a minority of deer tick bites leads to Lyme disease. The longer the tick remains attached to your skin, the greater your risk of getting the disease.