Bug Archives: Holiday

Happy Labor Day

What do people do?

Labor Day is a day of rest or the last chance for many people to go on trips before the summer ends. For students, it is the last chance to organize parties before school starts again. In some neighborhoods, people organize fireworks displays, barbecues and public arts or sports events. The football season starts on or around Labor Day and many teams play their first game of the year during Labor Day weekend.

Traditionally, people did not wear white clothes, particularly shoes, after Labor day. However, this custom is slowly dying out. More and more people now wear white all year round, rather than just in the summer. Similarly, it is the custom to wear a straw cowboy hat from Memorial Day until Labor Day, then a felt one until Memorial Day comes around again.

Public life

Labor Day is a federal holiday. All Government offices, schools and organizations and many businesses are closed. Some public celebrations, such as fireworks displays, picnics and barbecues, are organized, but they are usually low key events. For many teams, it is the start of the football season. As it is the last chance for many people to take summer trips, there may be some congestion on highways and at airports. Public transit systems do not usually operate on their regular timetables.

Background

The first Labor Day was held in 1882. Its origins stem from the desire of the Central Labor Union to create a holiday for workers. It became a federal holiday in 1894. It was originally intended that the day would be filled with a street parade to allow the public to appreciate the work of the trade and labor organizations. After the parade, a festival was to be held to amuse local workers and their families. In later years, prominent men and women held speeches. This is less common now, but is sometimes seen in election years. One of the reasons for choosing to celebrate this on the first Monday in September was to add a holiday in the long gap between Independence Day and Thanksgiving.

Labor Day Parade In Marlborough

Labor Day Parade 2012

When: September 3, 2012
Time: 12:00 PM

Marlborough, Massachusetts has a proud tradition of hosting the largest and most prestigious Labor Day Parade in New England!

 

 

In 1952, Mayor, Romeo J. Gadbois founded the first, annual Labor Day Parade as a way to brighten the lives of the Marlborough area communities which were, along with the rest of the nation, rebounding from WWII and then setback by the onset of the Korean War.

The first parade, managed by Louis Ghiloni, the city’s first Recreation Director, consisted of about 12 marching units. In the 58 years that followed, the parade has grown to be a New England premier event, consisting of over 150 bands, floats, and other entertaining entries.

Over the years, the management and growth of the parade has been a volunteer effort, most of which attributed to the efforts of George Whapham, who was the Parade Director from 1981 through 2008. The directorship and all the positions of parade day staff remain a volunteer effort.

Funds for the operation of the parade are partially a city line item, but the majority of the cost is covered by private and commercial donations.

Preparations for the parade start in February and then jump into full gear in April, increasing steadily until Labor Day.

Just remember to keep yourself protected from those pesky mosquitoes while you and your family are out for the day!!!

Summer Vacations, Beaches, Sleeping In And Bed Bugs?

Bed Bugs: the summer vacation souvenir no one wants

Posted by Rona Fischman  June 14, 2012 02:06 PM

Two weeks ago, I mentioned the opportunity to learn about bed bugs at a local conference. On June 15, you have the opportunity to learn all you need to know about bedbugs, and more. The event is sponsored by the Community Action Agency of Somerville (CAAS) in collaboration with Cambridge Health Alliance.

Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs for the National Pest Management Association writes today about how bed bugs get into a house. The NPMA, a non-profit organization with more than 7,000 members, was established in 1933 to support the pest management industry’s commitment to the protection of public health, food and property.

Imagine coming back from your summer vacation, relaxed and recharged, but within days of your return you wake up with red bumps on your legs and arms. Maybe you even notice pepper-like flakes on your bed sheets and you quizzically wonder what could it be? Unfortunately, the answer may be bed bugs, the vacation souvenir no one wants to bring home.So, what’s a vacationer to do? According to a 2011 National Pest Management Association and University of Kentucky survey 80 percent of pest professionals have treated bed bugs in hotels and motels. Although bed bugs are found in numerous places other than hotels, most travelers will stay in a hotel at one point or another during their vacation, putting themselves at risk of picking up these hitchhiking bugs.

Although bed bugs are not known to be vectors of disease, they can cause anxiety, sleeplessness, and emotional reactions in response to the knowledge that you’re sharing your bed with small bugs that suck your blood.

As with most pests, prevention is key. Here are several, easy but important tips, to keep in mind when traveling to ensure vacation memories, photos and actual souvenirs are the only things you bring back home:

• At hotels, pull back the sheets and inspect the mattress seams, particularly at the corners, for telltale stains or spots. If you see anything suspect, notify management and change rooms or establishments immediately.
• If you do need to change rooms, be sure that you do not move to a room adjacent and/or directly above/below the suspected infestation. Bed bugs can easily hitchhike via housekeeping carts, luggage and even through wall sockets. If an infestation is spreading, it typically does so in the rooms closest to the origin.
• Consider placing your suitcase in a plastic trash bag or protective cover during the
duration of your trip to ensure that bed bugs cannot take up residence there prior to departure.
• After traveling, inspect your suitcases before bringing them into the house. Vacuum your suitcase thoroughly before storing away. Consider using a garment hand steamer to steam your luggage, which will kill any bed bugs or eggs that may have hitched a ride home.
• Wash and dry all of your clothes – even those that have not been worn – in hot temperatures to ensure that any bed bugs that may have made it that far are not placed into your drawers/closet.

Memorial Day Events All Around

Wilmington: Parade starts Monday, 10 a.m., Market Basket, 260 Main St. parking lot to Church Street to Middlesex Avenue to Wildwood Cemetery for flag ceremony, placing of wreaths, musical presentation by Wilmington High School Band, Lincoln’s Gettysburg address, poem reading, taps, benediction.

Medford: Annual Veterans Service on Monday, 10 a.m., at Oak Grove Cemetery, Playstead Road.

Rowley: Parade steps off 1:30 p.m. Monday from VFW Hall on Bradford Street, proceeds to Town Hall Cemetery to Veterans Star, Firemen’s Memorial, Policemen’s Memorial to Village Green, back to VFW.

Lynn: Monday, steps off at 1:30 p.m. from North Shore Community College parking lot (Washington Street entrance). Washington Street, Broad Street, Market Street, City Hall Square, North Common Street, Park Street, Boston Street ending in front of Pine Grove Cemetery, 781-598-4000.

Danvers: The annual parade is Monday beginning at 9 a.m. Bertram Russell Jr., a Korean War veteran from the Marine Corps, will lead the parade as grand marshal. He is a recipient of two Purple Hearts with Gold Star and many other awards and commendations. Town Hall, 64 Cabot Road, 978-777-0001.

Everett: Service at 9:30 a.m. Monday at Glenwood Cemetery, Elm Street and Haskell Avenue.

Hamilton: Parade forms at Town Hall, 577 Bay Road, at 8:30 a.m. Monday, and steps off at 9 a.m. Firemen’s Memorial to Veterans Cemetery to Town Hall to Patton Park. 978-468-5570.

Ipswich: Parade forms on Town Hill on North Main Street at 9:45 a.m. Monday, and steps off at 10 a.m. Civil War Memorial to County Road Bridge to War Memorial to South Cemetery to VFW.

Woburn: Parade will start Monday at the Armory on Main Street, call to order at 8:15 a.m. www.cityofwoburn.com.

Mother’s Day Is Just 5 Days Away, Don’t Forget Her Flowers And Leave Out The Mites!!

Getting the bugs out — literally — of Mother’s Day flowers at LAX

By Art Marroquin, Staff Writerdailybreeze.com

The last thing any mom wants next weekend is a pest.

To keep that from happening, federal authorities are preparing for Mother’s Day by scrutinizing an estimated 40 million flowers for bugs, eggs and larvae hiding in shipments coming from South America, Asia and Australia.

“If you ask any mother who tries to grow flowers in her garden, you’ll always hear about having to deal with the insects,” said Jaime Ruiz, a spokesman for U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

“We don’t want anyone’s mom to deal with that for Mother’s Day.”

Armed with magnifying glasses and tweezers, the CBP’s trained group of agricultural specialists constantly search for unusual signs of disease or clues that mites, thrips, miner flies and other critters are feeding on lush shipments arriving at Los Angeles International Airport.

More flowers arrive in the United States for Mother’s Day than any other holiday, followed by Valentine’s Day, Ruiz said. Los Angeles handles 15 to 20 percent of the nation’s blooms, making it the second-busiest flower importer after Miami.

“Sometimes we don’t find anything, but finding something new to us is pretty exciting,” said Yaan Cheng, who has worked the past four years as a CBP inspector at LAX.

On Monday morning, Cheng grabbed a rose bouquet that had just arrived from Ecuador, flipped it upside down and gave it a strong shake.

Loose petals, leaves and other dry remnants scattered onto a white table as he reached for a pair of tweezers and plucked a twitching mite.

Cheng gingerly placed the insect into an alcohol-filled glass vial that will be examined to determine whether it is already established in the United States.

If the insect isn’t already present, then the entire shipment of flowers is sent back, destroyed or treated with chemical pesticides.

“One little bug that isn’t from here could wreak havoc in the agricultural sector,” Ruiz said.

The flowers arrive in the belly of passenger jetliners, and then are whisked to massive cold-storage units housed inside nearby warehouses.

Nearly 3.5 million flowers arrived last weekend from New Zealand, Ecuador and Colombia for inspection at Gourmet Logistics Co., which has a cavernous refrigeration unit that’s kept at a brisk zero to 45 degrees Fahrenheit.

The petals are kept in fresh condition until they are ready for distribution to West Coast flower shops and supermarkets, said Andy Iturrizaga, business relations manager for Gourmet Logistics Co.

It’s a great business,” Iturrizaga said. “Especially at this time of the year.”

http://www.dailybreeze.com/business/ci_20567745/getting-bugs-out-literally-mothers-day-flowers-at