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New Species Found In New Guinea

Here Are Some Of The New Species Found In New Guinea. From frogs and spiders to ants and bats.

Posted in Ant & Termite, Ant Eggs, Ant Swarmer, Ants, Article, Bugs, earth, insects, Residential Pest Control, Spiders
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Could There Be European Fire Ants In Massachusetts?

Well, there were European Fire Ants In Massachusetts, but we seem to be in the clear for now. But that does not mean it will stay that way. If you come in contact with them contact A1-Exterminators immediately!

European Fire Ants Emerge in Massachusetts

News that a pair of yards in a Cambridge, Mass., neighborhood was invaded by Myrmica rubra, or the European fire ant, serves as a reminder that this region is susceptible to this troublesome invader.

Brad Harbison | July 29, 2010 |
http://www.pctonline.com/European-fire-ant-Cambridge.aspx?List_id=31

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — When pest management professionals hear the words “invasive fire ant species” New England is generally not the area of the country from which they expect to hear these reports. But news that a pair of yards in a Cambridge, Mass., neighborhood was invaded by Myrmica rubra, or the European fire ant, serves as a reminder that this region is susceptible to this troublesome invader.

George Williams, general manager and staff entomologist for Environmental Health Services, Norwood, Mass., says Myrmica rubra have been in New England for more than 100 years, but the reports from Cambridge have refocused attention on this pest.
“Up until literally right now this ant was not a problem for homeowners. They are usually found in grassy, marshland areas,” Williams said. “In the case of (the Cambridge properties) the ants were spreading aggressively on the properties, in areas where children were playing, in the garden and under the deck.”
It’s believed the Myrmica rubra in Cambridge hitched a ride in hostas that a neighbor brought back from Maine. Williams and Harvard University Entomologist Gary Alpert, Ph.D, have been studying this recent outbreak. Alpert told WBZ that the area could experience what he calls a second wave that “is probably unique for Massachusetts.”
Alpert also told WBZ that once the females mate, they drop their wings and walk to a new nest, spreading from one yard to the next. “Think of it like a cancer. It doesn’t metastasize, it’s like one big tumor that just keeps spreading and spreading and spreading.”
There are several important behavioral differences between Myrmica rubra and the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta) — which is the invasive fire ant species most prevalent throughout the U.S. For example, Solenopsis invicta will construct complex mounds, whereas Williams says there is “no rhyme or reason” for how Myrmica rubra will behave on a property.
 “Carpenter ants, for example, will forage along trails, while (Myrmica rubra) will be found everywhere throughout a property — in bushes, up in trees, under stones, in railroad ties, rock walls, open lawn areas, under patio blocks, etc. In instances with supercolonies it will appear as if ‘the ground is moving.’”
In terms of identification, Myrmica rubra is a two-noded ant thatisreddish-brown in color. In addition to having the ability to sting, another important distinguishing feature is Myrmica rubra’spropodeum (the first abdominal segment fused anteriorly to the thorax) has two spines pointing backwards, which is one of the main differences with other native ants (not of the genus Myrmica) in the northeastern U.S, according to the University of Florida Department of Entomology website.
Williams said baits show the greatest potential for controlling Myrmica rubra, however there are several challenges with baits. “We are not sure of the efficacy of commercially available brands as sugars are consumed by workers whereas proteins go to the queens.” Williams said that there are no current fire ant baits registered for use in Massachusetts. “Broadcasting granular baits would pose the easiest application method vs. liquids and gel formulations since the application area is expansive and placement baiting outdoors would be labor intensive,” he said. “I would expect the non-repellent liquid products to work well on this species, however this is not a low impact application as non-target and beneficial insects are at risk due to the propensity of Myrmica rubra to forage on foliage, lawns, and trees. Williams and Alpert will be conducting a baiting study that they hope will shed additional light on the best ways to treat Myrmica rubra.

Posted in African Ants, Ant & Termite, Ant Eggs, Ant Swarmer, Ants, Article, Blog, environment, Fire Ants, Home, insects, Massachusetts, New England, News, pests, Residential Pest Control
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What Is An European Fire Ant?

European Fire Ant
Myrmica rubra Linnaeus
Subfamily Myrmicinae
Color: Reddish-brown
Size: 1/8 to 3/16 inch
DISTRIBUTION This species is widely distributed in Europe and was likely introduced into the northeastern U.S. in the early 1900s in imported plant materials. It has become a nuisance pest along coastal Maine and is also reported in New York, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and parts of southeast Canada. (For pest control in Massachusetts and New Hampshire contact A1 Exterminators.)
KEY BIOLOGY POINTS Where they occur, European fire ants are a health concern due to the painful stings they can inflict. Stings occur when people are outside enjoying their yard or a park or when gardening and disturb the workers or the colony. This ant may also impact the biodiversity in areas where it becomes established, outcompeting native ant species and attacking small animals.
Colony Structure. The colonies are moderate to large in size and contain multiple queens (polygynous). A colony may contain more than 20,000 workers and 600 queens. Colonies are also polydomous with multiple, interconnected nests.
Nesting Habits. A key factor in nest site location seems to be high humidity so nests are typically located under woody debris and leaf litter which retain moisture. Nest densities can be high with up to 1.5 nests per square meter. Like many pest ants, the colonies are highly mobile and can quickly be moved to areas with better resources. Nests are also possible in the soil of potted plants.
Foraging Behavior. Little is known about this species’ foraging behavior, but like most ants, workers likely follow structural guidelines for much of the trail.
Feeding Habits. These ants are omnivorous, feeding on dead insects and the honeydew produced by homopterous insects (e.g., aphids, mealybugs, and scale insects).
Colony Propagation. New colonies are formed by swarming reproductives. In the U.S., mating flights likely occur in late summer.

Source: PCT Field Guide for the Management of Structure-Infesting Ants, Third Edition

Posted in African Ants, Ant & Termite, Ant Eggs, Ant Swarmer, Ants, Article, Blog, environment, Fire Ants, insects, Massachusetts, New England, News, pests, Residential Pest Control
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Spring Is Here, The Flowers Are Blooming And The Insects Are Swarming

Now that spring is here the insects that have over wintered become active and swarm again, especially ants and termites, but they are not the only pests. Over the next few weeks you will see lots of insects making there way back into the world to join us in the beautiful days to come.

  • Moisture is a main component of the spring. Heavy rains, water from snow runoff and rising ground water levels can lead to damp basements.
  • Roof leaks, leaky skylights and water leaking around windows are all common places where carpenter ants go to nest in search of water.
  • Ground water provides moisture for termites and other crawling insects. As mentioned earlier, termites swarm in spring.
  • Carpenter bees are active, taking pollen from shrubs and plants and transporting it back to their nests – drilled, half-inch holes often found on garages and other areas around the home with an accumulation of sawdust and pollen around the hole.

Posted in Ant & Termite, Ant Eggs, Ant Swarmer, Ants, Aphids, Asian Long-Horned Beetle, Bed Bug Control, Bees, Bees, Hornets & Wasps, Beetles, Cockroaches & Other Insects, Blog, Boston, Bugs, Butterflies, Cape Cod, Climate Change, cluster flies, environment, Flies, flowers, Flying Pests, Hornets, insects, ladybirds, Massachusetts, Mosquitoes, New England, pest, Residential Pest Control, Wasps, yellowjackets
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Is Your Home Infested With Carpenter Ants?

Carpenter Ants are large, they are between .25 to 1 inch in length, They live throughout the United States but prefer dead, damp wood to build their nests. Carpenter ants are a common pest that may be infesting your home, especially the black carpenter ant.

Carpenter ants are not termites, they do not eat the wood in your home, but this does not mean they are harmless to your home. If you suspect you have a carpenter ant problem it is wise of you to contact A1 Exterminators immediately. Carpenter ants will cut through the wood in your home to build nest slowly tearing apart the wood and in the end, it may take longer than a termite, having a similar effect to your home if you were infested with termites.

How do you know if you have a carpenter ant problem? Call Us! But if you want to be a little more sure first, look for some signs. We all see ants roaming around throughout all of spring. But does that mean your home is infested and at risk?

The first sign you may see to warn you your home may need an exterminator are flying ants. In the spring, you may see swarms of flying ants throughout the area of you home. If you see this don’t wait to see more possible signs, call, there are not many other reasons flying ants are coming up from your porch. Waiting it out isn’t a risk you want to take. And unless you are looking for additional signs or you get a good look at the ants body, there is always the chance they were termites to begin with. And if that is the case, CALL!

I hope this little bit of information was helpful, with the beautiful weather the ants are already out and ready to build new nests. So keep your eyes open and phones ready to call us at 1-800-525-4825!

Posted in Ant & Termite, Ant Eggs, Ant Swarmer, Ants, Blog, Boston, Bugs, Carpenter Ants, Climate Change, Community, earth, environment, Fire Ants, Home, insects, Massachusetts, Nantucket, New England, pest, pests, Residential Pest Control, spring, spring insects, termite control, Termite Swarmer, Termites
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It’s Your Yard. Defend It. Against Mosquitoes And Ticks.

A1 Exterminators is now offering an Organic Mosquito and Tick Program.
“You can expect up to a 70-90% reduction in mosquito and tick populations around your home…. less pests and less risks of diseases”

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Removing Stink Bugs

If you find a stink bug in your home, chances are you will find more.  If you find one, do not squish it.  Vacuum up the stink bugs, and take note of spots where they crawl in or where you find concentrated numbers – these are likely entry points. Common places to look for emerging stink bugs are…

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Flea Control

You don’t want to have fleas in your home and we are sure your pets don’t want to have them on either. A1 Exterminators can keep those pests away.  Contact us for more information on flea control in your area.

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Bug Tip Tuesday – Wasp Traps

Enjoy the back yard again by trapping wasps in a container with vinegar, salt and sugar.  By placing containers of this mixture around your yard, the wasps will be attracted to the sugar and killed by the salt and vinegar.waspsphoto

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Lady Bug Jars

Send the kids out looking for Ladybugs!  Have them make these cute ladybug jars and send them out hunting.51e17d6496108de4b502ff96df9621c2

Supplies:

  • Clear plastic container
  • Paint & brushes
  • Eyes
  • Black marker

Have the kids paint the lid to their container what ever color they want, and then make black ladybug dots on the top.  Glue…

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Life Cycle of a Bed Bug

Female bedbugs can lay 200 to 250 eggs, which mature to adult stage within four to six weeks, meaning one or two bed bugs can turn into a massive infestation within a couple of months, if not caught and treated early. Bed bugs are resilient. Nymphs can survive months without feeding and the adults for more than a year….

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Stinging Insects

Honey bees are often confused with aggressive stinging insects like yellow jackets and wasps.  Bees and other pollinators support the environment in a vital way.  A1 Exterminators can protect you against stinging insect and protects bees for our environment.

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