Pest Control Blog About Bugs and Rodents

Welcome to A1 Exterminators’ Uninvited Guests blog! Here we talk about anything and everything bug related. Big and small, from ticks and bed bugs to roaches and termites; from bugs and insects to mice, rats, squirrels and rodents. Follow us to keep track of the new pests you should be worried about in your area. Get the latest news on pests, tips on how you can keep pests away from your home and business, and some other fun and interesting tidbits about bugs.

Get Bug Alerts

A1 Newsletter Sign-Up














Squirrels Looking for Warmer Homes

Gray Squirrels are active year round, but most productive in the morning and evening on dry days. Gray squirrels feed primarily on nuts, especially hickory nuts, acorns, beechnuts and walnuts. In addition, they occasionally feed on maple or tulip tree seeds, fruit, opening buds and corn. Pine Squirrels are also active year round, especially in the morning and evening. However, they are sometimes active after dark as well. Pine squirrels feed on a great variety of seeds, nuts, berries, bird eggs and fungi.

Habitat

Gray squirrels are found in hardwood or mixed forests with nut trees, especially oak-hickory forests and river bottoms. In the summer, gray squirrels nest in tree cavities or build nests made of leaves in branches. In the winter months, they are known to invade structures and homes looking for a place to overwinter. Pine squirrels are often abundant in any kind of forest and are commonly found around buildings. Pine squirrels usually nest in tree cavities or nests made of leaves, twigs and bark.

Threats

These species of squirrels are considered a household pest because they frequently enter attics in the winter; however, they rarely pose a health threat to homeowners. Outdoors, these squirrels can cause considerable damage to electrical and telephone cables.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Posted in Pest Control News

Spiders Looking for Homes

With about 3,000 spider species roaming around North America, a few are bound to end up in our homes more often than not. However only a few  of those pose any actual health dangers to humans – namely the brown recluse spider and the black widow spider. Although most spiders are nuisance pests, it is important homeowners familiarize themselves with these more dangerous species so they can protect themselves and their families and also be prepared to act if should be faced with one of these spiders in their home.

The Brown Recluse

Often identified by a dark brown violin shape on its back, the brown recluse spider is predominantly found in the Midwest and Southeast of the United States. This species is well known for its “secretive” behaviors, as it prefers to take residence in warm, dry and dark environments, such as woodpiles, basements and closets.

This arachnid bites, usually unintentionally when it feels trapped, typically when a hand or foot reaches into a shoe or piece of clothing or a box in the attic or basement where a brown recluse has made its home.  Because their bites can take three or more hours to develop and about three weeks to heal, it is important to keep an eye on the individual which was bitten.  The brown recluse venom can cause severe allergic reactions, notably in children, the elderly or those with preexisting medical conditions.

The Black Widow

Perhaps no spider is more notorious than the black widow. From their ominous appearance to the purported, but untrue, claim that the females devour the males after mating, these spiders are quite feared.

Black widows are found throughout the United States, but are most common in the southern and western states. These spiders are often found around wood piles and gain entry into a structure when firewood is carried into a building. They are also found under eaves, in boxes, and other areas where they are undisturbed. They bite when they are threatened.

Like the brown recluse, the black widow has a distinct pattern allowing for easy identification – a black body with red “hourglass” coloration on the underside of its abdomen.  The black widow venom contains a neurotoxin, which causes immediate pain at the bite site and then spreads to other areas of the body such as the chest and the abdomen. They also leave two puncture marks on the skin. Young children and the elderly are especially susceptible to severe reactions to black widow bites.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Posted in Pest Control News

Bug Tip Tuesday | DIY Mouse Repellent

Follow These Instructions:

  • Brew some peppermint tea.
  • Put the used tea bags in all the places in your home where you have noticed mice or spiders. It’s best to use them in every corner.
  • Another option is to use peppermint essential oil. Fill a spray bottle with water and add 10-15 drops of the essential oil. Spray around baseboards in your home.
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Posted in Pest Control News

Creepy Pests That Scare Anytime of the Year

During the month of October, it’s common to see bats, spiders and other creepy creatures.  Especially when they are attacking your front door in the form of trick-or-treaters on Halloween. However, there are some real-life ghoulish pests homeowners should look out for this fall.

While a wagon full of toddlers dressed as spiders is cute, it should remind you that actual pests infestations can be going on in your home and cause quite a big problem. You need to take preventative measures to keep pests from moving in for the winter.

Here’s a guide to some common critters that may spook homeowners this fall, along with tips to prevent them from turning the home into a haunted house.

Bed bugs – Bed bugs are similar to vampires in that they feed off of human blood, typically at night. These elusive pests do not transmit disease, but they can leave red, itchy welts on the skin. Always inspect the costume you have rented from the second-hand or costume store before you put it on.

Rats – One of the most reviled pests, rats can contaminate food, spread dangerous diseases and create fire hazards by chewing through electrical wires. Before homeowners bring boxes of pumpkins and faux cobwebs inside to decorate for Halloween, they should inspect them for signs of an infestation such as gnaw marks and rodent droppings.

Bats – Bats are frequent carriers of rabies, which can be fatal if left untreated. They often enter homes through attics, belfries and under fascia boards. Homeowners should screen attic vents and openings to chimneys, and install door sweeps this fall to keep bats out of the home.

Spiders – Some species of spiders, mainly the brown recluse and black widow, can administer a painful bite when disturbed. Homeowners can avoid coming in contact with spiders by wearing heavy gloves when moving items that have been stored for a long period of time and shaking out shoes before wearing them.

The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) offers some additional tips to prevent a pest infestation this Halloween season:

  • Seal cracks and crevices around the home’s exterior using caulk and steel wool. Pay close attention to where utility pipes enter the structure.
  • Keep basements, attics and crawl spaces well ventilated and dry.
  • Keep kitchen counters clean, store food in airtight containers and dispose of garbage regularly in sealed receptacles.
  • Store fire wood at least 20 feet away from the house and keep shrubbery well trimmed.
    If you see signs of an infestation in your home, contact a licensed pest professional.

For more information on common household pests and how to protect your home, visit www.a1exterminators.com.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Posted in Pest Control News

Overwintering Bugs

It is the time of the year when overwintering insects are determined to enter your home. The brown marmorated stink bug is one of the pests to contend with when the weather changes. There are also cluster flies, western conifer seed bugs, boxelder bugs and multi-colored asian ladybugs. These are the significant overwintering pests threats.

The western conifer seed bugs and the stink bugs emit foul odors, can stain housing materials like curtains, walls and linens. The multi-colored asian lady bugs, those harmless cute-looking little things also bite and can cause allergic reactions.

Overwintering Pest Control Tips:

  • Perform a thorough inspection to determine all possible pest entry points paying close attention to exterior light fixtures.
  • Light sources coupled with gaps typically leads to overwintering pests entry points.
  • Seal up entry points prior to the fall using a good quality silicone sealant.
  • Seal cracks and crevices around doors, windows, trim, interface of fascia and exteriors of walls, around utility pipes and around chimneys.
  • Install screens in exterior attic openings and vents.
  • Insecticidal dusts should be applied by a pest control professional to unsealed gaps, openings around exterior light fixtures and all unsealed penetration points leading into your home.

If you are still finding these insects in your home, contact A1 Exterminators to treat your home.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Posted in Pest Control News
Do you need these pests exterminated? Call A1 Today!

 

It’s Your Yard. Defend It.

Against Mosquitoes And Ticks.

A1 Exterminators is now offering an Organic Mosquito and Tick Program.

Get the Latests News for Pest Control in New England

Squirrels Looking for Warmer Homes

Gray Squirrels are active year round, but most productive in the morning and evening on dry days. Gray squirrels feed primarily on nuts, especially hickory nuts, acorns, beechnuts and walnuts. In addition, they occasionally feed on maple or tulip tree seeds, fruit, opening buds and corn. Pine Squirrels are also active year…

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Get the Latests News for Pest Control in New England

Spiders Looking for Homes

With about 3,000 spider species roaming around North America, a few are bound to end up in our homes more often than not. However only a few  of those pose any actual health dangers to humans – namely the brown recluse spider and the black widow spider. Although most spiders are nuisance pests, it is important homeowners familiarize themselves…

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Get the Latests News for Pest Control in New England

Bug Tip Tuesday | DIY Mouse Repellent

Get the Latests News for Pest Control in New England

Creepy Pests That Scare Anytime of the Year

During the month of October, it’s common to see bats, spiders and other creepy creatures.  Especially when they are attacking your front door in the form of trick-or-treaters on Halloween. However, there are some real-life ghoulish pests homeowners should look out for this fall.

While a wagon full of toddlers dressed as spiders is cute, it should remind you…

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Get the Latests News for Pest Control in New England

Overwintering Bugs

It is the time of the year when overwintering insects are determined to enter your home. The brown marmorated stink bug is one of the pests to contend with when the weather changes. There are also cluster flies, western conifer seed bugs, boxelder bugs and multi-colored asian ladybugs. These are the significant overwintering pests threats.

The western conifer seed…

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Get the Latests News for Pest Control in New England

Rodents Looking for Homes

When warmer days go away, rats and mice come out looking for warm shelter to spend the winter.  Usually in our homes.  Fall is the time of year when home owners should prepare for rodents seeking shelter in warmer places, and they should also understand the real damage these pests can do. Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Browse A1 Pest Control